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and it will be a financial boost for the city. >>> lawrence is out and about with the preview of the bay area science festival. what are you doing? >> oh, yeah. guys, i got to get this plane built. let me tell you, we're working on this really -- oh, i think i just bent the wing. [ laughter ] >> we'll have to do a little redo on that. but we're here enjoining the science festival at the tech museum of innovation. it's a great chance for you to bring the kids down. the whole family. there's something for everyone if you want to do it. it's taking place today and this weekend. so get down here and enjoy it if you want to do that. tell you what the weather is going to be great. we're looking at a lot of sunshine toward the afternoon. just a couple of high clouds drifting by. it's a little chilly in spots. some 40s and 50s. we are looking' patchy fog in the valleys so watch out for that. through the day, that should lift. high clouds will drift through but temperatures will be mild mainly in the 60s and 70s. but you know what? as we look toward the weekend that ridge really taking over. temperatures cou
is playing the science guy. i don't think you're ever coming back, lawrence. >> reporter: no. this is a lot of fun. a lot of kids can come down here and make some really interesting neat stuff. it's all part of a neat science festival they have at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to check it out. they have all kinds of things. this is what they are going to be using to launch some of those planes right here in the lobby and around the tech museum. they have exhibits, imax, real scientists that you can come down and meet and ask them very important questions too. the silicon valley really the center of what has been major innovations that really changed the world. you can come down and meet some of the scientists who have helped to make some of the changes. of course, the weather looking nice now. we are talking about some sunshine coming our way. we're going to need it this morning. it's chilly in spots, low 40s in the north bay valleys, 50s elsewhere, partly cloudy skies. we have a couple of patches of fog and high clouds likely to drift across our skies for today so
are joined from the weather team with more on the science of all this. what is causing a storm of this magnitude? >> ape ve very rare case that t hurricane made landfall in new jersey. it is hurricane season so we do see a lot of storms this time of the year. usually we do not have a high-pressure system over the atlantic, called the blocking anti-cyclone, pretty self-explanatory from that name. but, you said this high-pressure system acts like a block. it is locked out of this system to move into the northeasterly path which usually -- the storms take place, take paths in that direction. but due to this high pressure sitting over here, for a while, it is very strong. cushions it, toward the eastern seaboards, of the united states. and this time -- it did make a landfall in the eastern coast. hence, the biggest storm in generations. now it has the become a remnant of low-pressure systems, so, it is much weaker than, than it was when it hit a landfall. though the tropical moisture brings all the humidity and turns and makes a lot of downpour as cross ts across the. you can see t
an answer or maybe not oh easy answer. this is not just something that is science fiction. we have to deal with it. anything that anybody has mentioned. >> we keep hearing everybody talk about it. we're going to come back and learn from this and build something stronger arrested better. you hear the politicians say that now after this situation that we've had. i have not heard one specific thing like this is what we're going to do. this is how much it's going to cost. homeland security secretary quoteds a saying, this could be the most expensive recovery in history. hurricane katrina cost $106 billion. that's how much it cost to recover from that hurricane. this is going to surpass that. people are going to be thinking what can we do better so we don't have these horrible situations happen, and spending all this money that america will have to spend to recover from it it. >> eliot: the ex-spans and swath from new jersey, pennsylvania upwards, the devastation is huge. the economic toll, the cost of human life enormous, and awful to see. brandi hitt, thank you for joining us tonight. >> eli
often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> governor christie throughout this process has been responsive. he's been aggressive in making sure that the state got out in front of this incredible storm. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and the people of our state. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie standing together side by side surveying the damage from hurricane sandy. they have gone from adversaries to praising each other. my guest michael moore. we did cover the rockaway blaze in the midnight show on monday night in to tuesday morning. i was anchoring that toward the end. we were one of the first networks to get it on the air. >> but two or three hours after it happened. my point is, can you imagine if 110 homes were burning right now in los angeles? >> sure. >> it would be another three hours we heard about it. >> no. but you have to take it in the context of everything else going on in new york. >> my point is that everything going on wa
. but you're quite right that many scientists have been very cautious and science has a cautious culture. you could almost say a conservative culture. their peer review process discourages them from even thinking about going out on a limb. and so they -- they are inherently cautious and conservative. but the evidence is now so overwhelming. you know, in the last ten years you showed some of the statistics but there there's an analysis of the extreme hot temperatures on the surface of the earth. they're now 100 times more common than they were just 30 years ago. and it is these extremely hot temperatures that are responsible for the increased evaporation, the increased water vapor in the air the increased drought. and remember this is hardly the only climate related disaster that we've had this year. 65% of the united states has been affected by a very widespread and extreme drought this year. food prices have been affected. much of the west, including the epic fire in colorado springs was on fire this summer
have climate problem. and majority of americans believe in science. we have allowed the ignore ray mouses run the show on this and this should put an end to that. >> could it be that they have been measuring weather since 1898, could it be a global cyclical weather thing, actually not global warming but something that may have happened 500, 1,000 years ago you get pockets of this and we don't have the records to back it up. could it be that. >> i will answer it the way mayor bloomberg answered it, it could be that but do you want to take a risk? what if you are wrong? we are not prepared like we weren't prepared for this and we won't be prepared for the next thing and we weren't prepare fdr the drought this summer. how many times do we get punched in the face before we realize, something is punch me in the face. >> chad, you have been in the game nearly three decades, is this global warming we are seeing from a meteorological point of view, is there any other explanation. >> it's the prime suspect. i don't have one. maybe particulates in the air. the rain drops, the moisture can ge
-- the national academy of sciences, the journal, proceedings of the national academy of sciences took a survey of scientists who work on this a couple of years ago, and there was agreement among 97% of scientists that fossil fuel emissions from human activity lead to global warming. are warming the atmosphere. that's an incredibly high consensus. so it's 97% in agreement. 3% in disagreement. at this consensus. at this point the scientific consensus is very, very strong that burning coal and oil and fossil fuels is warming the planet and leading to these extreme weather situations. >> so, this question really, then, is directed to the 3% of scientists as we look at the latest cover of "business week" it speaks for itself, coral, we had new york city mayor michael bloomberg endorsing the president in a piece largely focused on climate change. is this a wake-up call and could it end the debate? >> the problem is you can't ever say any one specific weather event is caused by climate change but you can look at the growing stack of reports saying we know we're going to see more of this. the national
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
believes in science and does not scoff at the idea of climate change and has taken concrete action to combat it, mr. bloomberg said the choice to him is clear. "one sees climate change as an urgent problem that threatens our planet. one does not. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." this endorsement criticized mitt romney's leadership on the other hand saying, "in the past mr. romney has also taken sensible positions, but he has reversed course on all of them and is even running against the health care model he signed into law in massachusetts." mike bloomberg criticizes mr. romney specifically for flip-flopping and dropping his previous positions on climate change then says, "this issue is too important. we need determined leadership at the national level." in other words, i don't think we're going to get determined leadership from mitt romney. i think he has taken occasionally attractive positions, but leadership, no. speaking to you from new york city, this storm and its aftermath, this externality to the big election i
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. if we took the nissan altima and reimagined nearly everything in it? gave it greater horsepower and best in class 38 mpg highway... advanced headlights... and zero gravity seats? yeah, that would be cool. ♪ introducing the completely reimagined nissan altima. it's our most innovative altima ever. nissan. innovation that excites. ♪ >>> the waves churned up here along the chesapeake bay bridge in virginia beach. we're back with a final check on the path of hurricane sandy. weather channel meteorologist mike seidel is? virginia beach, new jersey tonight, where the wind is whipping up. where can we expect the storm to moving in the next few days? >> reporter: the atlantic now taking over the entire beach here at point pleasant. this morning's high tide was up to there. and lester tomorrow we have two disastrous high tides. by tuesday, this entire coastline is going to be rearranged. take a look at the swirl off cape hatteras, we're still more than 500 miles
the final 12 miles from the l.a. airport to the science center proved to be some of the toughest crews chopped down 400 trees to clear the path for the endeavour. in a matter of hours nasa will update us on the rover mission to mars. curiosity is almost three months into its two year mission. it has sent back images and scooped up martian sand for analysis. if everything goes as planned curiosity will make its way to mount sharp within a year to determine chemistry and whether the red planet has ever harbored life. update from fast 11:30. >>> sandy's path of misery millions without power thousands flooded out in the east. the super storm is living up to its name. live with the statest coming up. >>> we'll tell you about the search-and-rescue role as the storm surges across the east coast. ah. fire bad! just have to fire roast these tomatoes. do you churn your own butter too? what? this is going to give you a head start on your dinner. that seems easier sure does who are you? [ female announcer ] new progresso recipe starters. five delicious cooking sauces you combine with fresh ingre
change and casting doubt on the science of climate change cost him dearly today. new york's independent mayor mike bloomberg endorsed president obama referring both to hurricane irene last august and sandy this week. bloomberg wrote and i quote "in just 14 months, two hurricanes have forced us to evacuate nakeds, something our city had -- never done before. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." for more, we have on the phone -- what's going on to get to millions of commuters to work tomorrow, i'm joined by phone by metropolitan transportation spokesman aaron donovan. thanks for joining us. >> thanks, governor, you bet. >> eliot: we know you've begun to get some of the subways above 34th and 42nd street moving again. what will be open tomorrow and then if you could, give us an update on the tunnels which seem to be the major impediment to expanding traffic. >> well, at this point in time, our subway system is essentially cut in half. we have some service
. >>> the final home of the space shuttle endeavour is open to the public. opening up the california science center in l.a. it features videos, and artifacts from endeavour and the artifact, the shuttle itself. >>> the wizards fourth-quarter comeback falling short. the team's reaction is up next. >> now -- [ indiscernible ] >> yo. >> where is my chicken nuggets! >> ya. >> halloween prankster, a zombie decided to trick young workers at the drive-thru. and the man rears and lunges out terrify -- roars and lunges out terrifying teenagers. teen . >>> the until is still reviewing deangelo hall's outburst with the officials on sunday. a decision is expected tonight or tomorrow. the commissioner said in a radio interview today that the league has very strong rules in the areas of sportsmanship and respect for officials and they will enforce them a grill. -- aggressively. we're not only waiting word on hall but waiting for the recovery of merryweather. the safety has yet to play in a game this year and is hampered by a spring ligament in the left knee since the spring season. reaggravateed twice, in
-- >> jennifer: that's the language of science right? >> it isn't really. much of science isn't like that. like anything that i just mentioned about biology economics and so on. but climate scientists are using that incorrectly. there is real systemic causation here. and systemic causation happens when certain things are present. for example you might have multiple causes. you might have a network of causes. you might have feedback groups. all of those really occur in nature. and what happens here is very clear. in hurricane sandy you have a special kind of hurricane that is normal. actually when you have global warming. it is normal because its characterization is it's huge. it has a huge amount of moisture. it has a huge amount of energy that goes into the winds. how does this happen? every climate scientist knows perfectly well that when you have global warming you get more evaporation over the oceans lots more moisture in the air. when that happens you get heat in the oceans. heat transfers in storms into wind
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> the day after the devastation with governor christie president obama was back campaigning and five days to go until the election, jennifer granholm, former governor of michigan and republican strategist kellyanne conway, welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> let me start with you if i can, kellyanne. mitt romney a week ago was off a momentum and heading possibly to victory on tuesday. which ever way you look at this, this hasn't been a good few days for him politically. clearly the most important thing is the safety of the people involved. >> absolutely. >> and we accept that. but politically his momentum has stalled. the president has been out there being a president. >> it could be. but i'm with mayor booker and governor christie on this one, which is, it's so difficult to even a talk about politics at a time like this but you have tuesday coming up. you have early voting going on right now in the states. so the events in front of them, i think it can go either wa
the whole man here, you're the senior science journalist for the "huffington post." okay, we we could put walls up, but shouldn't we go to the source of the problem fossil fuels. >> you have to mitigate the effects because in some respects it is a little too late to reverse this problem. but you also want to work as hard as you can to stop it from getting any worse. we can talk about this kind of two degree celsius problem, and we can get to the technical stuff. but the truth is it's already gotten so bad and even if we stopped putting emissions in the atmosphere it will still get worse for many, many years. >> cenk: let's talk about that for a minute. we have thisthere is magical reverse when we need it. it seems that that would be the time. >> they're saying, the scientists will do all that. >> cenk: seriously is there a way to reverse it. >> to reverse climate change? >> cenk: it just times. >> it a function of making sure it doesn't get worse. we are we at that level. >> cenk: that was a hard-hitting ad against mitt romney against climate change. should democrats--that was an outside
, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. connell: governor cuomo helping to get this gas shortage fixed pretty soon. hopefully some relief pretty quickly. dagen: we go to new jersey where we find elizabeth macdonald on the scene. >> good to be with you guys. we are about 40 miles. we are in transit. 40 miles or the new york city. we are seeing the lines continue to grow. it is a 2-mile long. there were state troopers trying to keep tteir peace out here. fuel tankers are entering new york harbor. expect a fuel shortage to ease quickly. 80% of the gas stations in new jersey are off-line. they do not have power. fox business has learned from aaa that the reason why 80% of the gas stations are off-line is due to power issues, electrical power is needed to run the gas pump. it is also needed to run the gas pipelines that delivers the fuel into the area. according to authorities, this dual problem will be starting to ease come sunday and into next week. they are saying if you do not need to be on the roads, do not be on the road. we are t
from his first daof work this last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. frotd ameritrade. >> well, today's big storm on the east coast taking some attention away from the election and it's only eight days away. and both candidates are more focused on hurricane sandy. obviously, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. charles: and also appears to be slowing town mitt romney's momentum. the latest gallup has romney up 4 points, 50-46 down one point from the previous poll and the latest rasmussen poll has romney romney by 3. we'll get the new number from scott rasmussen shortly and the washington poll, romney with a 1 point lead for the third consecutive day and a lot of people are talking about the controversial ad featuring, actress lena dunham. >> and of anybody, we want to do it with a great guy, it should be with a guy with beautiful, who understands women. >> and andrea, what congresswoman marsha blackburn. a young actress voting for the essential october is offensive to me f
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
and from here it's going to go up. the tidal predictions are to the exact science. it's almost like river forecasts. the high drolgss make them with the best knowledge they have. it's not as good as your forecast we give you days in advan advance. it's not the exact science. fluid situation with the storm and a lot of factors and so right now, we're thinking it's going to be about two to three feet higher than what we saw when it was down here on the edge splashing over. that means if i was standing right here at about 8:30 this evening, the water could potentially be somewhere between here to here with wave action over the top of that. this is a flat area in lower manhattan. not a lot of elevation change. about three blocks in inland they have the subways all sandbagged. they are expecting the worst and the possibility of all the water heading underground to the subway system. normally it's heavy rains. they do get flooded. this is saltwater. the electrical switches, all the problems they could have with that. think of the nightmare they would have trying to replace that stuff if it got
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> what i can't promise you is that the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. >> we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks, and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey is a site that we've identified that can take these goods and distribute them to people who need them. >> oh, it's hard out there for a presidential candidate who is utterly irrelevant to the massive relief effort president obama is running in the aftermath of this week's historic storm. because the desperate and shameless romney campaign believes it cannot win the election without winning ohio, team romney pushed their poor candidate out onto a stage in ohio yesterday because the storm was still in progress in some states and the death count was climbing in new york and elsewhere. traditional political decency dictated that mitt romney not be caught campaigning yesterday. and so team romney hastily rewrote a campaig
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> it's hard out there for a man named mitt this week. we have some very, very silly video of mitt romney. next. in "the rewrite." ♪ [ crowd cheering ] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ that's the sound of car insurance companies these days. here a cheap, there a cheap, everywhere a cheap... you get it. so, what if instead of just a cheap choice, you could make a smart choice? like, esurance for example. they were born online and built to save people money from the beginning. it's what they've always done. not just something they cheap about. that's insurance for the modern world. esurance. now backed by allstate. click or call. >>> what i can promise you is the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. >> we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks, and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey is a site that we've identified that can take these goods and distribute the
the deficit and still make investments in things like education and training, science and research, and, guess what, plenty of folks who were running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy, that it would kill jobs, and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out their math was just as bad back then as it is today. because by the end of bill clinton's second term, america had created 23 million new jobs, and incomes were up and property was down, and our deficit became the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin, we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. in the eight years after bill clinton left office, his policies were reversed. americans got tax cuts they didn't need. companies got tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas. oil companies and wall street were given free license to do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. the result of this top-down economics was falling income, record deficit, the slowest
, science, research. and guess what? plenty of folks running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy. that it would kill jobs. and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out, their math was just as bad back then as it is today because, by the end of bill clin totoclinton's turn am created 23 million jobs. the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. because in the eight years after bill clinton left office his policies were reversed. the wealthiest americans got tax cuts they didn't need, and that we couldn't afford. companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas, insurance companies, oil companies, wall street given free license do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. and result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, record deficits, smallest job growth in a half century and economic crisis that we've been cleaning up for the last four y
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> you've seen the lines, the angry customers. you know the story -- there just isn't enough gasoline for everybody that needs it in the impact zone of this storm. before we go to our reporters from the latest -- for the latest from the front lines, let's take a step back and walk through the whole process from ground to pump. crude oil that is pumped from the ground is then transported by pipeline, tanker or barge to a refinery. and that's where the oil undergoes several processes, changing it into many products. but mainly for this purpose, gasoline. from there it is shipped, usually again through a pipeline, to a terminal. at th
'll send it back to youm. >> thank you, lara. >>> back out to sam, walk me through the science here, how long could they be on alert in hawaii? >> dan, first of all, as soon as that earthquake happened, knowing that it's 7.7, they did all of the right things. they put the warnings out, thinking that may this would be a bad run of waves. evacuating those lower levels of hawaii were a very good idea. so, you e initially think that first wave would run away from that, remember, this is a subsiding zone, one plate is underneath another plate. a little wave or two and one or two, three, in this case four waves went out and went toward hawaii and down the coast of california as well. now, normally, you would look for the bigger waves and the bigger tsunami problems, at an 58 or 9, they did the absolute right thing by getting those sirens out. these waves have been traveling, like two to four feet in many locations, you can't give everyone the all-clear until the entire system said that the water has traveled. until the buoys have said it's all calm you can't give the all clear. there may be mo
of items and save $4 on hills® science diet® dog & cat food. plus, get $5 in holiday bonus bucks with qualifying purchase. only at petsmart®. you don't disappear at midnight. and now, you've met your match. revlon colorstay 16 hour eyeshadow. 64 colors that will take you from night to day without smudging, creasing or fading away. can your moisturizer do that? [ female announcer ] dermatologist recommended aveeno has an oat formula, now proven to build a moisture reserve, so skin can replenish itself. that's healthy skin for life. only from aveeno. >> >>> sandy roared up the east coast leaving widespread destruction. the superstorm is blamed for 16 deaths in seven states. an estimated 5.7 million customers are without power and many could remain in the dark for a week or more. damage is projected to cost between $10 and $20 billion, making sandy one of the costliest natural disasters in u.s. history. nearly 14,000 flights have been canceled. >>> maybe hard to believe but amid the damage and heartache brought on by hurricane sandy, there's some positive news to emerge from the di
a superstorm. >> you mentioned that the sea ice in greenland is gone. melded. >> do you believe that science is -- >> absolutely. >> what do you say to them? >> these are the same people that say that adam and eve road on doinosaurs. let's say that maybe you are right, but do you want to take the chance that maybe you are not right. what is the harm in preparing or changing our way of life so that we don't dose trestroy the plan. if they are going to want the same thing that we have had and that -- gentleman choh chad. thank you very much. we are going to talk to mike about voter turnout. you want americans to vote and you explain why. [ male announcer ] do you have the legal protection you need? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy with step-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom help
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> jennifer: so for several months now, christine pelosi and i have been trying to get duf sundheim to throw his support behind the president. tonight is our final penitentiary. welcome back to you both. duf are you ready to say uncle? >> you know what, i didn't find the fact that you called the fact that your father your favorite republican, but when you put christie ahead of me it hurt my feelings. >> jennifer: all right. epic fail on my part. >> here you can have the halloween candy. okay. chris christie had a beautiful moment today. not only did barack obama look very presidential but chris christie took a tentative step towards 2016. >> jennifer: yeah, let's just say that duf could have a beautiful moment right here. >> i think that was back in april 15th that you were right. >> jennifer: let me do something here, duf. vice president biden had a very interesting line about mitt romney today. take a listen in florida. >> his plans are sketchy, they are etch-a-sketchy. that's wh
most climate science is junk science, they even would never tie an event ike this to climate change. here's the thing that i pointed out to you, andrew, the last category 3 hurricane was wilma, that was seven years ago. this is the longest period in a century in terms of how long we've been between category 3. back in 1954, between august '54 and august of 1955, the east coast saw three different storms make landfall each of which caused twice as much damage as sandy. now you weren't born in 1954. it caused twice as much. here's the chart of the average global temperature and this quietly was reported by the uk climate office. that shows the average variability from 14 degrees celsius which is the average. there's the no discernible rise in 16 years. >> cuomo's point he was trying to stay out of the controversial subject. he said the political ban derte doesn't want to get to. his question is should new york be prepared for flooding. maybe this is a situation talked about yesterday we're building in areas we shouldn't be building in. >> the storm that caused $180 billion in damage.
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